SHOP NOW TO NOURISH YOUR GUT • SHOP NOW TO NOURISH YOUR GUT • SHOP NOW TO NOURISH YOUR GUT • SHOP NOW TO NOURISH YOUR GUT • SHOP NOW TO NOURISH YOUR GUT • SHOP NOW TO NOURISH YOUR GUT •

SHOP NOW TO NOURISH YOUR GUT • SHOP NOW TO NOURISH YOUR GUT • SHOP NOW TO NOURISH YOUR GUT • SHOP NOW TO NOURISH YOUR GUT • SHOP NOW TO NOURISH YOUR GUT • SHOP NOW TO NOURISH YOUR GUT •

Our Science

Using state-of-the-art pharmaceutical methods, our scientists have identified the highest quality, most potent ingredients to improve intestinal health, blood sugar levels, immunity, appetite control, and more.

Did you know?

Less than 5% of Americans consume the recommended amounts of fiber per day.

Inside Eden’s

PREBIOTICS

Prebiotic fibers promote good bacteria in our digestive tract by providing them with sustenance and creating an environment where they can flourish.

PROBIOTICS

Probiotics are beneficial, living microorganisms which provide support and restoration to our ecosystem of gut flora when consumed.

POLYPHENOLS

Polyphenols are plant-derived compounds that can act as antioxidants, protecting your cells from free radicals and boosting immunity against chronic disease.

Maintaining a healthy metabolism starts with nourishing 🍽️ your microbiome.

The microbiome is a new frontier—a symbiotic system of 100 trillion microorganisms, mostly bacteria 🦠, that feed off your gastrointestinal tract 🌀 and, as a by product, produce vital metabolites, like short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), that influence many areas of your health including energy metabolism, appetite control, and even mood. So when your gut flora is wilting 🥀 you feel the effects everywhere—from poor digestion to sugar crashes and brain fog. 🌩️

While probiotics found in foods like yogurt can increase the amount and diversity of good bacteria, more recent science 🔬 has shown that the key is nurturing them with dietary fibers and prebiotics that will strengthen 💪 what’s already there. That’s why we designed Eden’s to supercharge 🔋 the specific gut bacteria responsible for metabolism and immunity.

“The typical diet is very fiber deficient. January is committed to formulating products that improve health by promoting a healthy microbiome.”

Justin Sonnenburg, PhD

SCIENTIFIC ADVISOR & AUTHOR OF “THE GOOD GUT”

Research & Studies

Fiber-Deprived Gut Microbiota

Cell

MARTENS, DESAI, ET AL.

Fiber-Deprived Gut Microbiota

Cell

MARTENS, DESAI, ET AL.

Fiber-Deprived Gut Microbiota

Cell

MARTENS, DESAI, ET AL.

Nourish Your Inbox, Too 📬

Eden’s fiber news, exclusive discounts, and scientific articles you can actually digest.

Tracey McLaughlin, MD, MS

SCIENTIFIC ADVISOR

Dr. McLaughlin graduated from Stanford University with honors and distinction in Human Biology, obtained an MS in Public Health at UC Berkeley, and MD at UC San Francisco. She completed her residency in Internal Medicine at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center and her fellowship in Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism at Stanford University School of Medicine. She is currently a clinician investigator and maintains an active clinic for patients with complicated type 1, type 2, or other forms of diabetes, polycystic ovarian disease, and hypoglycemia. Her clinical research program includes human studies on obesity, regional fat distribution, and the role of adipocytes and adipose tissue immune cells in promoting insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. She also conducts studies on the role of incretin hormones in glucose metabolism and post bariatric hypoglycemia, and the use of continuous glucose monitoring and multi-omics methods to define metabolic sub-phenotypes and precision diets for individuals with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes.

Dariush Mozaffarian, MD, PhD

SCIENTIFIC ADVISOR

Dr. Mozaffarian is a cardiologist, Dean, and Jean Mayer Professor at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, and Professor of Medicine at Tufts Medical School. Dr. Mozaffarian has authored more than 400 scientific publications on dietary priorities for obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases, and on evidence-based policy approaches and innovations to reduce these burdens in the US and globally. He has served in numerous advisory roles including for the US and Canadian governments, American Heart Association, World Health Organization, and United Nations. His work has been featured in a wide array of media outlets; and Thomson Reuters has named him as one of the World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds.

Dr. Mozaffarian received a BS in biological sciences at Stanford (Phi Beta Kappa), MD at Columbia (Alpha Omega Alpha), residency training in internal medicine at Stanford, fellowship training in cardiovascular medicine at the University of Washington; an MPH from the University of Washington; and a Doctorate in Public Health from Harvard. Before being appointed as Dean at Tufts in 2014, Dr. Mozaffarian was at Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Public Health for a decade and clinically active in cardiology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

Eric Martens, PhD

SCIENTIFIC ADVISOR

Dr. Martens received his PhD in 2005 from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, working with Heidi Goodrich-Blair, PhD on the biology of the entomopathogenic nematode, Steinernema carpocapsae, and its bacterial symbiont, Xenorhabdus nematophila. He then trained with Jeffrey I. Gordon, MD at Washington University School of Medicine, investigating the physiology of beneficial human gut bacteria, especially members of the Bacteroidetes and their interactions with complex carbohydrates. His current research interests include investigating the roles of gut bacteria in human digestive physiology, the gut microbiome in inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer, genetic exchange between environmental and gut bacteria and the mechanism through which gut bacteria break down dietary fiber polysaccharides and mucin glycoproteins.

Justin Sonnenburg, PhD

SCIENTIFIC ADVISOR

Dr. Sonnenburg is an Associate Professor of Microbiology and Immunology at Stanford University and a member of Bio-X. He received his BS in Biochemistry from UC Davis and his PhD from UC San Diego in Biomedical Sciences in 1996. His research program aims to elucidate the basic principles that govern interactions within the intestinal microbiota and between the microbiota and the host. Specifically, the Sonnenburg lab is exploring the effects of perturbations in the intestinal environment, such as changes in diet, microbial community composition, pathogen exposure, host genotype, and microbiota-targeted small molecules. To pursue these aims, his lab studies germ-free mice colonized with simplified, model microbial communities, applies systems approaches and uses genetic tools for the host and microbes to gain mechanistic insight into emergent properties of the host-microbial superorganism.

Parag Mallick, PhD

SCIENTIFIC ADVISOR

Dr. Mallick is an Associate Professor at Stanford University. Originally trained as an engineer and biochemist, his research spans computational and experimental systems biology, cancer biology and nanotechnology. Dr. Mallick received his undergraduate degree in Computer Science from Washington University in St. Louis. He then obtained his Ph.D. from UCLA in Chemistry & Biochemistry, where he worked with Dr. David Eisenberg. He completed postdoctoral studies at The Institute for Systems Biology, in Seattle, WA with Dr. Ruedi Aebersold. Beyond studying fundamental disease mechanisms, his group has been pioneering novel approaches for enabling personalized and predictive medicine. Most recently, his group has been developing model-based and physics-based approaches to machine learning that enable learning over domains that span a wide range of time and length scales.

Nima Aghaeepour, PhD

SCIENTIFIC ADVISOR

Dr. Aghaeepour is an Assistant Professor at Stanford University. Dr. Aghaeepour’s graduate research focused on bioinformatics analysis of single cell data. Dr. Aghaeepour and colleagues have developed a pipeline that identifies cellular correlates of clinical outcomes from high-dimensional flow cytometry datasets. His team has also established the very first objective benchmark for evaluation of algorithms that could automatically identify cell-types (and, eventually, correlate them with clinical outcomes). Dr. Aghaeepour is interested in the intersection of data sciences, immunology, and clinical phenotyping. His lab develops machine learning/artificial intelligence methods to study the immune system in clinical settings. This includes integrative multi-omics analysis across genomics, proteomics, and single-cell technologies, as well as quantitative clinical phenotyping using wearable devices, to produce a holistic understanding of immunity.

Dalia Perelman, CDE

SCIENTIFIC ADVISOR

Dalia Perlman is health educator and a research dietician at Stanford University in the department of Medicine. Dalia received her bachelor’s degree in microbiology and her Master’s degree in Nutritional Sciences and completed her graduate research in Molecular Biology at Stanford University. Dalia is a certified diabetes educator and worked at the Palo Alto Medical Foundation for 14 years counseling patients.

Michael Snyder, Phd

SCIENTIFIC ADVISOR

Dr. Snyder received his Ph.D. training at the California Institute of Technology and carried out postdoctoral training at Stanford University. He is a leader in the field of functional genomics and proteomics, and one of the major participants of the ENCODE project. Snyder Lab was the first to perform a large-scale functional genomics project in any organism, and has developed many technologies in genomics and proteomics. These include the development of proteome chips, high resolution tiling arrays for the entire human genome, methods for global mapping of transcription factor binding sites (ChIP-chip now replaced by ChIP-seq), paired end sequencing for mapping of structural variation in eukaryotes, de novo genome sequencing of genomes using high throughput technologies and RNA-Seq. These technologies have been used for characterizing genomes, proteomes and regulatory networks.

SUPPORT